Mr Tig Blog

D17.1 Certification Tips and Tricks for .063 Flat Plate Aluminum

Oct 2014 16
15 15 Thu
Written by Mr. TIG (Wyatt Swaim)

D17.1 Certification is primarily an aerospace certification, however it can be applied to many different industries. In this episode of TIG Time we look at how to certify for .063 flat plate Aluminum. There are a few things that you will want to do to insure that you have the best results when going for your certification; afterall, often times being certified is the difference between having and not having a job!

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Everlast Power Plasma 50: Unboxing and Review

Oct 2014 09
15 15 Thu
Written by Mr. TIG (Wyatt Swaim)

Plasma cutters are on the rise among welders and fabricators due to their ease of operation and low cost to operate. Many welders are supplementing their shops with these versitile cutting machines, because it is so cheap to do so now. (If you are looking for more information on Plasma cutting for beginners, click this link) Unlike Oxy-Acetylene cutting and welding, plasma cutters don't require any special gas; just compressed air. In this episode, we look at the Everlast PowerPlasma 50. This is a 50 amp, dual voltage plasma cutter that is affordable, coming in at only about $850. So lets take a look at some of the things we liked and didn't like about the unit:

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Why You Can't TIG Weld with a MIG Mix Gas

Sep 2014 12
15 15 Fri
Written by Mr. TIG (Wyatt Swaim)

Have you ever tried to TIG weld with your MIG mix welding gas? Well if so, you know that it doesn't give you the best results. In this episode, Wyatt joins fellow YouTube welder and artist, Kevin Caron to answer the questions, "Why can't I use my MIG mix for TIG welding"?

Not only will Wyatt give you the technical reasons about why this doesn't work, but Kevin will hook up a 75 / 25 (Argon / CO2) mix and a 100% Argon tank, to show you the difference in how your weld will turn out if you do in fact use the right gas.

Some things DO mix between processes:
While it is never recommended to use a MIG mix for TIG welding, there are some things that can be mixed between these two processes. For instance, many people prefer tacking their projects with the MIG process, because they can do it with one hand and hold the part with the other. If done correctly, you CAN tack with GMAW and finish your welds with GTAW (learn more about TIG welding through MIG tacks here).

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Water Cooled TIG Welding: How to Setup your Machine

Sep 2014 30
15 15 Tue
Written by Mr. TIG (Wyatt Swaim)

TIG welding is a difficult welding process to master. However, most welders that are moving to a water cooled welding system have already learned how to TIG weld and they have found that they need a little more power out of their machine. For the guys who have just purchased their first water cooled system, or those who are thinking about getting a new water cooled system; this video will give you the knowledge you need to get started.

When you make the switch to water cooled, you should always ask yourself a few questions before you make the investment:

Why do you want to go water cooled?
So you are considering making the jump from an air cooled welder to a water cooled system... Why? On TIG Time we have done hundreds of videos and only a small percentage of them have used a water cooled setup. The reason for this is, most welders simply don't need the extras that water cooled TIG welding systems afford you. Unless you are welding above 200 amps or consistently welding at 200 amps and meeting your torches duty cycle, air cooled is probably the way to go. However, if your torch is consistently gettign too hot to handle you may need to upgrade your welder. (See our Intro to Water Cooled Welding for more info)

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Introduction to Water Cooled Welding

Sep 2014 26
15 15 Fri
Written by Mr. TIG (Wyatt Swaim)

Water cooled TIG welding is an area of TIG welding that many people think they NEED to get into. The fact of the matter is; unless you are running at [or near] 200 amps on a consistent basis (where you will approach the duty cycle of your torch) or you are welding above 200 amps, you really don't need a water cooled system. However, once you get into a 250 amp machine, it is a good idea to look into moving from air cooled to water cooled, because most people buy 250 amp machines for the higher end.

One of the major differences between water cooled and air cooled systems are in the torch itself (see more on air cooled torches). Most people are familiar with air cooled torches. Air cooled torches are easier to setup, smaller, and generally cheaper than their water cooled counterparts. However, when you need your torch to last at high amps for long periods of time, moving to water cooled torches are a necessity (learn more about different types of water cooled TIG torches here).

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