RAPID ARC / RAPID X WELDING TUTORIAL

by Jason Becker


Today, we're going to talk a little bit about RapidArc and RapidX, the differences between the two and the advantages of both. So, let's get started.

- [Jason] So we'll start off with some RapidArc, it's a hybrid between pulse and short circuit.


- [Bob] What gas we're going to run today?


- [Jason] We're going to run some 90/10. And probably right around 40 CFH.


- [Bob] Run it up there a little higher than normal then


- [Jason] Right, because of faster travel speeds... A lot faster travel speeds.


-[Jason] So as compared to traditional pulse that a lot of people are familiar with with RapidArc we can get 40 percent faster travel speeds and about 15 percent less weld spatter So production goes up and the cleanup, the post-weld cleanup goes down.


- [Bob] That's a big deal, no labor in clean up.


- [Jason] Yes sir


- [Bob] Man we've got all these programs in there so you just go to your material type your wire size, and we've got values that automatically pop up.


- [Jason] Lets go over that. So if I go to search mode. So say I want to do RapidArc but I'm stuck over here on SMAW for low hydrogen electrode, I go in here to the weld search mode, click on begin, I know I want to do some gas metal arc welding or metal inert gas depending on what part of the country you're from and I know that the material we're working on today we're doing some two by eight, three sixteenths coupons, carbon steel.


- [Bob] Did you say coopins?


- [Jason] I said coopins.


- [Bob] You're a good man!


- [Jason] Weld coopins.


- [Bob] Welcome to the world. That's good stuff right there.


- [Jason] We're going to run some .035 diameter, 70S-6 series wire and then we'll go back and select our wave forms, so I can run it through here, I can do constant voltage, regular CV and then I can input my own wire feed speed and voltage, dependent on what I like or what the welding procedure specification calls for. So we'll go back here to the RapidArc, we'll get that dialed in. Now you'll notice the wire feed speed is a heck of a lot faster than you'll see with pulse or short circuit.


- [Bob] Man oh man, 800 inches a minute.


- [Jason] So we're going to run 800 inches a minute with a trim value of 1. So when we set this up depending on the wire feed speed that we want to use to weld on these coupons here the voltage is already pretty set. So we've got some little elf running around in there, as soon as I put 800 inches a minute he goes over there and he bumps the voltage up I'm guessing around 24 volts, 25 volts if I had to take a guess. But then we have our trim value here, and that's going to allow us to play with our arc length a little bit more.


-[Bob]And trim value relates to that voltage.


-[Jason]Exactly, its just a more fine tune adjustment for that, so if I want a little bit longer arc length, probably going to give me a little bit wider of a puddle a little bit more wetting on the sides, and if I want to shorten that up, especially on thinner materials or tight spots, if I want to narrow up my weld profile, I can go ahead and drop that down. Especially getting out of positions.


- [Bob] Plus number on the trim value on this machine gives you more arc voltage and more arc length. We're running 800 inches a minute, and we're defaulted at 1.0 across there for your trim value or that. But you could still play with both of them.


-[Jason]Yeah, we could and every welder's going to weld just a little bit different, you're probably going to like something a little bit different than I do. Typically I mean, when it hits one, that's usually what I run, unless I'm getting out of position. Then I start playing around with those trim values a little bit more just a little bit more unforgiving out of position than it is flat.


- [Bob] Sure. All right, I think we're ready to make weld.


- [Bob] Now notice your profile on this first run here, acceptable but you can notice that it's got a little peak to it. So on the second run you put in here, you softened up that wire feed speed a little bit by about 25 inches a minute and that made a pretty big difference.


- [Jason] Yeah it made that puddle a little more manageable, when you pull that trigger you've got to go quick.


- [Bob] Yeah, might want to have an idea of where you're going before you ever pull the trigger 'cause it's going to blow out some material in a hurry. I can understand why you'd want to run 40 cubic feed per hour, 'cause I'm watching your weld and you're red way out here about an inch behind your nozzle so you need to flood that area.


- [Jason] It's all about the gas coverage.


- [Bob] High speed, the spark stream is a lot smaller, we're not getting anything stuck to the material. So we're not warped up because of our travel speeds.


- [Jason] Yeah and I mean you've got less heat.


- [Bob] Also traveling quite a bit too.


- [Jason] So you get less heat input because you're increasing your travel time although you're increasing your AMPs, your voltage, you're decreasing you're increasing that wire feed speed so you get a lot less heat input, a lot less joules as they would say. And overall it's a real fast welding process, it's really good for hard automation and robotics, things of that nature. I don't think man was meant to go that fast with that much consistency. So it does really well in the robotic applications.


- [Bob] Interesting process, so this was RapidArc and we've got another one we want to showcase which is RapidX?


- [Jason]Got one more we're going to showcase, it's RapidX process. So it's very similar to the RapidArc. It was born out of the RapidArc. They came out with RapidArc, which is basically a hybrid between short circuit and pulse spray. So you know they redefined that waveform a little bit and they developed RapidX, which is going to give us a little bit less travel speed but a lot less spatter, so instead of 50 percent increase in travel speed with RapidX we're only going to have about a 40 percent increase in travel speed as compared to traditional pulse. But the upside is we're going to have about 30 percent less spatter, so it's even less spatter than the RapidArc process.


- [Bob] So this is RapidX.


- [Jason] Typically with both of these processes you want to keep about a three quarter inch contact tip to work distance.


- [Bob] Kind of like a traditional spray


- [Jason] Yes


- [Bob] Pull it back there and let it happen. Okay. Between the two of them when you switched over and pulled the trigger, I noticed a tone change. RapidX is like higher pitch.


- [Jason] Much higher like I always refer to it as a pissed off hornet.


- [Bob] Yeah, weed eater on steroids.


- [Jason] Oh yeah, you can definitely tell just in the volume of it.


- [Bob] I also noticed that there was a lot smaller of a spark stream. I'm kind of watching what's going on in and around your weld pool, I'm watching the spark shower coming off of there if you will. But between the tone change and the sparks,


- [Jason] RapidArc is about ten inches faster than the Rapid X, but I mean this one's sound, the pitch is definitely a lot higher and I think that's just because of the pulsing current.


- [Bob]The weld pool freeze faster a little bit on RapidX?


- [Jason] I think it freezes a little bit faster on the RapidArc myself.


- [Bob] Okay, I still notice you're nice and hot behind your gas nozzle as you're going down through there.


- [Jason] Yeah it's leaving a hot trail behind it.


- [Bob] Which one do you like better?


- [Jason] I'm a bigger fan of RapidArc than I am of RapidX. I think its just a user preference. We run a lot of RapidArc on the robot when we're running that, just seems like an easier process to run, a little bit smoother. Easier to get dialed in.


- [Bob] Get those values and that arc length trimmed down.


- [Jason] Yeah I've got everything sorted out on that. I probably need to play around with RapidX a little bit more.


- [Bob]I appreciate you having me in today and showing me the different programs and values and talking with us on camera and explaining it to the viewers about what some of these programs will do.


- [Jason]Yeah man, I'm glad to have you out here, I'm glad I could be of help.


- [Bob]Appreciate it.


- [Jason]So this is Jason Becker with weld.com here with Bob Moffatt, thank you guys for watching, hope you guys enjoyed the video as much as we did making it. Make sure you like and subscribe to the video, follow us on Instagram and Facebook.

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